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A Winter Wonderland

It's been bitterly cold here as of late; though as I write this the mercury is steadily rising and promises to climax near 60 by Wednesday. Regardless, last week was downright Siberian in terms of weather and feel and our beloved Susquehanna River froze over just to prove it. This past Saturday, on a whim we decided to test the ice.
 
 Standing in the middle of the river looking east towards the new Arch Street Bridge.
 
 I sent the boys on ahead just to make sure the ice would indeed hold us.
 
 When Bryce didn't crash through the ice we knew it was probably safe to go gallavanting.
 
 And so I followed on behind, ever-cautious and listening for that ominous popping sound in the ice.
 
 To be honest, it was the first that I had ever been on the Susquehanna when it was frozen solid and I was duly impressed by the splendor and majesty of the snow-covered river set against the snow-covered mountains.
 
Josiah, with ever the eye for art, pointed me to to ice formations.

In the middle of the river where two competing ice flows met.
 
 
We eventually grew tired of the river and decided to head north into the mountains.
 
 We drove through Rose Valley
 
 And ended up in the middle of Rose Valley Lake, helping the local ice fisherman drill holes.
 
 It took the strength of 3 to drill through 5 inches of ice.
 


 We said goodbye to Rose Valley and via a circuitous route that took us through Blackwell and Slate Run we headed home.
 
 The Pine Creek Gourge outside of Blackwell
 
 An unfrozen and swiftly moving Pine Creek

There was not a person to be seen in the entire town of Cedar Run but this signpost did grab our attention.


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